Synthesis De Novo of Choline, Production of Choline from Phospholipids, and Effects of CDP-Choline on Nerve Cell Survival

  • R. Massarelli
  • R. Mozzi
  • F. Golly
  • H. Hattori
  • F. Dainous
  • J. N. Kanfer
  • L. Freysz
Conference paper
Part of the FIDIA Research Series book series (FIDIA, volume 4)

Abstract

The repair of nerve cell membranes may overcome or, at least, alleviate neurological damage and diseases. The mechanisms responsible for such a repair are not known but they appear to be mediated by some components present in the plasma membrane of nerve cells. Much experimental data suggest that glycolipids, especially of the ganglio series present in large amount in neuronal membranes, may mediate one of the steps implicated in the repair and regeneration of nerve cells (De Felice and Ellenberg, 1984). Among other components of plasma membranes the fundamental “bricks” of all animal cell membranes are the phospholipids. Their function has been considered for a long time to be purely structural and this concept has often assumed the idea of passivity. It was customary, until recently, to think of phospholipids simply as a wall of constraint for the cytoplasmic content of the cells and as a useful support for proteins floating in a hydrophobic bilayer.

Keywords

Nerve Cell Elsevier Science Publishing Free Choline Glial Cell Culture Synaptosomal Plasma Membrane 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. Massarelli
    • 1
  • R. Mozzi
    • 2
  • F. Golly
    • 1
  • H. Hattori
    • 3
  • F. Dainous
    • 1
  • J. N. Kanfer
    • 3
  • L. Freysz
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre de Neurochimie du CNRS, U44 de l’INSERMStrasbourg CedexFrance
  2. 2.Department of Biological Chemistry, The Medical SchoolUniversity of PerugiaPerugiaItaly
  3. 3.Department of Biochemistry, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of ManitobaWinnipegCanada

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