Pharmacological Properties of Phosphatidylserine in the Aging Brain: Biochemical Aspects and Therapeutic Potential

  • G. Calderini
  • F. Bellini
  • A. C. Bonetti
  • E. Galbiati
  • R. Rubini
  • A. Zanotti
  • G. Toffano
Part of the FIDIA Research Series book series (FIDIA, volume 4)

Abstract

Our interest in phospholipids as pharmacological agents for the central nervous system (CNS) arose many years ago when a phospholipid mixture extracted from bovine brain was shown to affect a number of cerebral biochemical and functional activities (Maniero et al., 1973; Toffano et al., 1974; Leon et al., 1975; Toffano et al., 1976). Soon after it was realized that, of the various phospholipids, only phosphatidylserine (PtdSer) was able to mimic the effects observed with the whole mixture (Bruni et al., 1976; Leon et al., 1978; Bigon et al., 1979; Toffano and Bruni, 1980). Our attention was then focused on the pharmacological properties of PtdSer and its effects at the molecular level. In young animals biochemical, behavioral and electroencephalographic observations indicated an effect on catecholaminergic and cholinergic systems (Toffano et al., 1978; Casamanti et al., 1979: Pepeu et al., 1980; Toffano and Bruni, 1980; Canonico et al., 1981; Toffano et al., 1981; Aporti et al., 1982). Because these neurotransmitter pathways are deeply involved in the aging-dependent deterioration of cerebral functions, it was important to assess the PtdSer pharmacological properties in the aging animals. A multiple approach was adopted including the assessment of parameters ranging from EEG and behavior to the molecular mechanisms involved in information processing.

Keywords

Passive Avoidance Prolactin Secretion Memory Dysfunction Neurobiol Aging Plasma Prolactin Level 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. Calderini
    • 1
  • F. Bellini
    • 1
  • A. C. Bonetti
    • 1
  • E. Galbiati
    • 1
  • R. Rubini
    • 1
  • A. Zanotti
    • 1
  • G. Toffano
    • 1
  1. 1.Fidia Neurobiological Research LaboratoriesAbano Terme, PadovaItaly

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