Serine Phospholipids in Cell Communication

  • A. Bruni
  • L. Mietto
  • A. Battistella
  • E. Boarato
  • P. Palatini
  • G. Toffano
Part of the FIDIA Research Series book series (FIDIA, volume 4)

Abstract

Communication between distant cells depends on the release of signals in the intercellular space. These signals (first messengers) are collected by receptors located in the external cell membrane of a target cell a and then transduced in the cell interior through a perturbation of the second messenger system. Phospholipids, as components of plasma membrane, participate in this signalling system. Cycles of polyphosphoinositide degradation and resynthesis in response to the activation of membrane receptors generate the second messengers diacylglycerol and inositol trisphosphate (Berridge and Irvine, 1984). Since 1976, when the first pharmacological effects of phosphatidylserine (PdtSer) in vivo were described (Bruni et al., 1976), our efforts have aimed at exploring whether serine phospholipids are involved in a system of intercellular communication. As shown in Figure 1, the basic assumption of this hypothesis is that PtdSer is held in the inner side of plasma membrane in order to avoid the exposure of the serine headgroup to the external environment. Since the first observations of Verkleij et al. (1973) and Gordesky and Marinetti (1973), many studies have confirmed that this hidden position is the preferred distribution of PtdSer in the plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells. When a cell is broken, PtdSer is exposed and lysoPtdSer may be generated. These two phospholipids, either as components of a damaged membrane (Ptd Ser) or as free monomers in solution (lysoPtdSer) may reach responsive cells signalling that adjustment or repair is requested. To establish a first messenger effect of serine phospholipids at least three criteria must be fulfilled: (a) the generation of lysoPtdSer upon cell damage, (b) the existence of binding sites for serine phospholipids in sensitive cells and (c) the functional response following the interaction of these compounds with the target cell.

Keywords

Mast Cell Nerve Growth Factor Histamine Release Inositol Trisphosphate Mouse Mast Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Bruni
    • 1
  • L. Mietto
    • 2
  • A. Battistella
    • 2
  • E. Boarato
    • 2
  • P. Palatini
    • 1
  • G. Toffano
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PharmacologyUniverisity of PadovaPadovaItaly
  2. 2.Department of PharmacologyFidia Research LaboratoriesAbano TermeItaly

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