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Natural Hazards

A Cross-Cultural Perspective
  • John H. Sorensen
  • Gilbert F. White
Part of the Human Behavior and Environment book series (HUBE, volume 4)

Abstract

A camper in the Big Thompson Canyon, Colorado, ignores the heavy rainfall, and his trailer is swept away during a flash flood. A family in coastal Bangladesh, not wanting to leave their home and possessions, are reported missing after a tropical cylone ravishes the area. A farmer in Tanzania shrugs his shoulder and watches the sky for rain to replenish his shriveled crops. Similarly, the occupants of a small wheat farm in Kansas pray that the next year will bring better weather. Small store owners in San Francisco, California, and Managua, Nicaragua, earning their livelihoods miles apart, laugh, saying that there is nothing you can do about earthquakes, for God is responsible.

Keywords

Natural Hazard Human Response Hazard Event Natural Event Gross National Product 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • John H. Sorensen
    • 1
  • Gilbert F. White
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of GeographyUniversity of HawaiiHonoluluUSA
  2. 2.Institute of Behavioral ScienceUniversity of ColoradoBoulderUSA

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