The Context and Consequences of Contemporary Sex Research: A Feminist Perspective

  • Leonore Tiefer

Abstract

Practicing scientists rarely take the opportunity to reflect on the philosophies—scientific, political, and personal—which guide our work. Moreover, sophistication in such analysis is neither part of our training nor is it an expected or rewarded part of our professional competence.

Keywords

Sexual Behavior Sexual Experience Sexual Arousal Sexual Response Biological Theory 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leonore Tiefer
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyColorado State UniversityFort CollinsUSA

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