The Temporal Patterning of Copulation in Laboratory Rats and Other Muroid Rodents

  • Benjamin D. Sachs
  • Donald A. Dewsbury

Abstract

The value of studying a single species in the detail that has been lavished upon the laboratory rat depends in part upon the assumption that the species will prove an adequate model from which one may derive principles that will be generalizable to other species. The application of this problem to the specific case of the control of copulatory behavior in rats has been discussed (Beach, 1956; Dewsbury, 1973), and some speculative generalizations from rats to other muroid rodents were made by Sachs (this volume). A minimal basis for such generalizations includes evidence that the functional relations among different aspects of the behavior are similar among different species.

Keywords

Copulatory Behavior Sperm Transfer Diallel Cross Copulatory Pattern Microtus Ochrogaster 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Benjamin D. Sachs
    • 1
  • Donald A. Dewsbury
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of ConnecticutStorrsUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of FloridaGainesvilleUSA

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