Hexachlorophene

  • Alastair Hay
Chapter
Part of the Disaster Research in Practice book series (DRP)

Abstract

Hexachlorophene, the other major product derived from trichlorophenol (see Chapter 1), is a general poison effective in the control of bacteria classified as gram-positive. In the cosmetics industry, hexachlorophene is used as a preservative. For medical purposes hexachlorophene is used in the control of staphylococcal organisms. The bacteriacide has four main uses: treatment of acne and impetigo, cleansing of intact skin around burns and wounds, presurgical washing and cleansing of newborn infants, particularly the umbilical cord.

Keywords

British Medical Journal Staphylococcal Infection Intact Skin Hexamethylene Diamine Bereave Parent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alastair Hay
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemical PathologyThe University of LeedsLeedsEngland

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