Posttraumatic Responses to Childhood Abuse and Implications for Treatment

  • James A. Chu

Abstract

In July 1993, the National Research Council (1993) published a comprehensive volume entitled Understanding Child Abuse and Neglect. In this volume, statistics from the US Department of Health and Human Services documented reports of child maltreatment in 1990 involving more than 2.7 million children. Not surprisingly, childhood trauma, usually in the form of childhood physical, sexual, or emotional abuse, or profound neglect, is a common feature in psychiatric patients. In recent years, clinical observations concerning childhood abuse and research studies have found that childhood physical and/or sexual abuse is reported in the histories of nearly two thirds of adult female psychiatric patients (Bryer, Nelson, Miller, & Krol, 1987; Chu & Dill, 1990; Surrey, Swett, Michaels, & Levin, 1990). Through clinical observations and recent research, the impact of both severe childhood abuse and the dysfunctional environments in which abuse occurs have increasingly become more clearly defined.

Keywords

Sexual Abuse Borderline Personality Disorder Personality Disorder Childhood Trauma Borderline Personality Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • James A. Chu
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Dissociative Disorders ProgramMcLean HospitalBelmontUSA
  2. 2.Department of PsychiatryHarvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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