Directions of Environmental Psychology in the Twenty-First Century

  • Daniel Stokols

Overview

During the past 30 years, environmental psychology has documented the behavioral significance of the large-scale, sociophysical environment and contributed a variety of new concepts and methods for analyzing people environment transactions (Stokols, 1995). At the same time, effective applications of environment behavior research have been achieved within several community problem-solving arenas. Environmental psychology, as it exists today, spans multiple disciplinary and cultural perspectives, and offers abundant opportunities for collaboration among researchers from different regions of the world. The cross-cultural scope of the field has expanded dramatically in recent years, with the establishment of several international organizations that sponsor yearly conferences on environment-behavior research (e. g., IAPS, EDRA, the Environmental Psychology Section of the International Association of Applied Psychology) and the Journals of Environmental Psychology (JEP), Architectural and Planning Research (JAPR), and Environment and Behavior (E&B), which highlight cross-cultural research and reviews of scientific developments in different regions of the world. The Proceedings of the Fourth Japan USA Seminar on Environment-Behavior Research, from which this book evolved, clearly exemplify the multidisciplinary and international orientation of the field today.

Keywords

American Psychologist American Psychological Association Global Environmental Change Environmental Design Urban Design 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel Stokols
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Social EcologyUniversity of CaliforniaIrvine, IrvineUSA

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