Effect of Feeding Ergovaline and Ergine on Growing Rats

  • E. L. Piper
  • M. S. Gadberry
  • T. M. Denard
  • Z. Johnson
  • M. Flieger

Abstract

The ergot alkaloids and specifically the ergopeptide, ergovaline have been implicated as alkaloids which are responsible for producing fescue toxicosis. Because of the lack of availability of the suspect alkaloids, studies using fescue alkaloids have been limited to in vitro or in vivo studies in which small quantities of the drug is injected or infused into animals. In earlier studies in our laboratory, we produced fescue toxicosis symptoms in rats fed a diet containing endophyte (Neotyphodium coenophialum, Glenn et al., 1996) infected tall fescue seed (E+) which had 5 ppm of ergovaline but were unable to produce any toxicosis symptoms with an endophyte-free seed diet in which 20 ppm of the ergopeptide, ergotamine was added (Gadberry et al., 1995). With the availability of synthesized ergovaline (F. Smith, Auburn University), experiments were designed to test the ability of ergovaline (primary ergopeptide found in E+), as well as ergine (primary ergot alkaloid) on their ability to produce the toxicosis symptoms.

Keywords

Control Diet Skin Temperature Feed Intake Ergot Alkaloid Serum Prolactin 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Glenn, A.B., C.W. Bacon, R. Price, and R.T. Hanlin. 1996. Molecular phylogeny of Acremonium and its taxonomic implications. Mycologia 88: 369–383.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Gadberry, S. T. Denard, A. Moubarak, Z. Johnson and B. Piper. 1995. Effect of endophyte infected fescue seed and endophyte-free seed with added ergopeptide on fescue toxicosis symptoms. Fescue Toxicosis Workshop, SCRAIEG-8–8, p. 11, Nov. 1995, Nashville.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. L. Piper
    • 1
  • M. S. Gadberry
    • 1
  • T. M. Denard
    • 1
  • Z. Johnson
    • 1
  • M. Flieger
    • 2
  1. 1.University of ArkansasFayettevilleUSA
  2. 2.Institute of MicrobiologyPragueCzech Republic

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