Application of Endophyte Allozyme Analysis to Lolium Perenne Population Ecology in Hill Country Pasture

  • D. J. Barker
  • M. J. Christensen
  • Christie Wever

Abstract

Differentiating morphologically identical ryegrass (Lolium perenne L.) cultivars or ecotypes is prerequisite to quantifying their persistence when sown into swards of the same species. This differentiation can be achieved biochemically with plant allozymes (Sanders et al., 1989). Since Christensen et al. (1993) found characteristic allozyme patterns for different endophytes, this study investigated whether differentiation between mixtures of ryegrasses with different endophytes could be achieved using endophyte allozymes.

Keywords

Tall Fescue Perennial Ryegrass Hill Country Meadow Fescue Explorer Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Christensen, M.J., A. Leuchtmann, D. D. Rowan, and B. A. Tapper. 1993. Taxonomy of Acremonium endophytes of tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea), meadow fescue (F. praten.sis) and perennial ryegrass (Latium perenne). Mycol. Res. 97: 1083–1092.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Sanders, P. M., D.J. Barker, and G. S. Wewala. 1989. Phosphoglucoisomerase-2 allozymes for distinguishing perennial ryegrass cultivars in binary mixtures. J. Agric. Sci., Camb. 112: 179–184.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. J. Barker
    • 1
  • M. J. Christensen
    • 1
  • Christie Wever
    • 2
  1. 1.AgResearch — GrasslandsPalmerston NorthNew Zealand
  2. 2.International Agricultural College LarensteinVelpThe Netherlands

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