Academic Underachievement and School Refusal

  • John B. Sikorski
Part of the Issues in Clinical Child Psychology book series (ICCP)

Abstract

That the spectrum of behaviors from subtle academic underachievement to blatant school refusal and drop-out are considered serious health risks in adolescence is no surprise to concerned parents, teachers, professionals, and the American public at the end of the 20th century. This century was proclaimed to be “The Century of the Child” in the first White House Conference on Children in 1909 (Beck, 1974), wherein the national consciousness and governmental policy was to be mobilized to improve the care, education, and welfare of the nation’s children.

Keywords

Adolescent Psychiatry School Failure Specific Learning Disability School Refusal Disable Student 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • John B. Sikorski
    • 1
  1. 1.Child and Adolescent PsychiatryUniversity of California, San FranciscoSan FranciscoUSA

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