Role of Platelet-Activating Factor in Skeletal Muscle Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury

  • Donald Silver
  • Animesh Dhar
  • Milton Slocum
  • John G. AdamsJr.
  • Shivendra Shukla
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 416)

Abstract

Blood flow can be restored to limbs after 1 to 2 hours of ischemia with the expectation that the limbs will survive and be functional. Adverse changes may occur during reperfusion of skeletal muscle which has been ischemic for 3 hours or more. These changes, ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI), can include endothelial cell swelling, increased micròvascular permeability, leukocyte endothelial adhesion, vascular thrombosis, altered vascular resistance, no reflow phenomenon, altered monocyte/neutrophil function and even death of the ischemic reperfused cells.

Keywords

Gracilis Muscle Muscle Necrosis Skeletal Muscle Injury Leukocyte Endothelial Adhesion Scintillation Proximity Assay 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald Silver
    • 1
  • Animesh Dhar
    • 1
  • Milton Slocum
    • 1
  • John G. AdamsJr.
    • 1
  • Shivendra Shukla
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryUniversity HospitalColumbiaUSA

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