Cultural Resource Protection

A Predictive Framework for Identifying Site Vulnerability, Protection Priorities, and Effective Protection Strategies
  • Harriet H. Christensen
  • Ken Mabery
  • Martin E. McAllister
  • Dale P. McCormick
Chapter
Part of the The Springer Series in Social Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

Federal land managers have limited personnel and funds to accomplish many programs mandated by Congress, one of which is cultural resource protection. Thousands of cultural resource sites have been recorded on Federal lands in the Southwestern United States, and more are discovered daily. It has been estimated, for example, that only seven percent of the sites on Federal lands in the Four Corners area have been found and recorded (General Accounting Office 1987). Many of the recorded and unrecorded sites are targets for unauthorized disturbance, including the looting and theft of artifacts and other types of defacement, but only a few known sites have been protected through law enforcement activities or other measures (Downer in press; McAllister in press; Nickens et al. 1981; Waldbauer in press). The majority are unprotected.

Keywords

Cultural Resource Site Vulnerability Federal Land General Technical Report Cultural Resource Management 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Harriet H. Christensen
  • Ken Mabery
  • Martin E. McAllister
  • Dale P. McCormick

There are no affiliations available

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