The Spatial Ecology of Stripped Cars

  • David Ley
  • Roman Cybriwsky
Part of the The Springer Series in Social Clinical Psychology book series (SSSC)

Abstract

An inclination toward the analytical and topical rather than the synthetic and global sometimes obscures from our view parsimonious regularity in the outside world. As an example, consider the geography of crime. Every crime has fixed spatial coordinates, a location. The scale of the location varies widely, from the specific site of a block mugging to broad tracts of territory which may remain under the hold of lawless bands for decades. But, despite this range of scales, might there be particular types of locations amenable to crime? Might there exist a common set of spatial ecological conditions favorable to deviant behavior?

Keywords

Criminal Activity Deviant Behavior Spatial Ecology Vacant House Deviant Activity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • David Ley
  • Roman Cybriwsky

There are no affiliations available

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