Stone Tools pp 245-278 | Cite as

Projectile Points, Style, and Social Process in the Preceramic of Central Peru

  • John W. Rick
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

This paper argues that, to move forward in research on stone tool style, we must supplement theoretical discussion with examination of large data sets for stylistic patterning. Using a large projectile point collection excavated from cave sites in the high altitude region of central Peru, I demonstrate the presence of robust patterning at a number of levels of stylistic resolution. I use hierarchy of stylistic subdivisions within the projectile point class to evaluate key variables at a number of stylistic scales, including measures of diversity and continuity. The analysis produces evidence of stylistic foci and transitions between them that reflect social process: the evolving social conditions which affect the material output of identity. I argue that there is evidence of complex residential and interactional relationships across time and among the occupants of these Andean sites.

Keywords

Social Process Type Group Stone Tool Affinity Group American Antiquity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • John W. Rick
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyStanford UniversityStanfordUSA

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