Bioethics and the Federal Government

Some Implications for Psychiatric Genetics
  • Robert Mullan Cook-Deegan

Abstract

Psychiatric genetics lies at the confluence of several turbulent streams in social policy. It increasingly involves the tools of molecular genetics, one of the fastest evolving areas of modern science; it taps into the ethics of genetic research, particularly the special aspects of family studies; and it deals with clinical conditions that by definition hinder normal mental functions, thus complicating the process by which individuals agree to participate in research. The symptoms of psychiatric conditions are behavioral, and the study of how genes influence behavior has long been attended by controversy. As historian Daniel Kevles noted, “In its ongoing fascination with questions of behavior, human genetics will undoubtedly yield information that may be wrong, or socially volatile, or, if the history of eugenic science is any guide, both” (Kevles & Hood, 1992).

Keywords

Cystic Fibrosis Federal Government Government Printing Chronic Granulomatous Disease Behavioral Research 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Robert Mullan Cook-Deegan
    • 1
  1. 1.National Academy of SciencesUSA

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