A Hunger for Knowledge and Respect

  • Mary Ann Beall

Abstract

In January, 1993, the congressional Office of Technology Assessment held the first major meeting on genetics and mental illness to invite to the table, on an equal footing with world-class researchers, those most profoundly affected by the topic at hand: people with severe mental illness and our families. This inclusiveness challenges discriminatory assumptions, prejudices, and oversimplification of complex etiologies which have dogged the quest to eradicate major mental illness, and still dog us, who have no choice but to live in the belly of that beast.

Keywords

Mental Health Mental Illness Genetic Counseling Severe Mental Illness Psychiatric Disability 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary Ann Beall
    • 1
  1. 1.Virginia Alliance for the Mentally IllRichmondUSA

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