Plasma Antioxidant Trace Element Levels and Related Metalloenzymes in Algerian Women

Impact of Pregnancy
  • B. Lachili
  • A. M. Roussel
  • J. Arnaud
  • M. J. Richard
  • C. Benlatreche
  • A. Favier

Abstract

Since its independence, a real demographic burst has been observed in Algeria. The Algerian population which was 8,5 millions in 1962, is now reaching 29 millions of inhabitants. Although the Algerian Government favours the birth control, the fecondity index remains 4.4 per woman and 40% of the population is younger than 15 y old (1). In these conditions, the biological and clinical survey of Algerian pregnant women represents an important public health challenge. In this study, we have focused on trace element status in Algerian pregnant and non pregnant women as no data were available concerning trace elements in this group of population, except few works about iron deficiency. However, numerous changes have been reported in micronutrients during pregnancy (2) associated to biological changes in mother, or increased needs due to the fetal growth and placental tissue constitution, and sometimes consequently to decreased dietary intakes. Thus, the risk of deficiency especially in antioxidant trace elements has to be considered in relation with a potential enhanced oxidative risk during pregnancy.

Keywords

Plasma Zinc Zinc Status Public Health Challenge Selenium Status Oxidative Stress Index 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • B. Lachili
    • 1
  • A. M. Roussel
    • 2
  • J. Arnaud
    • 2
  • M. J. Richard
    • 2
  • C. Benlatreche
    • 1
  • A. Favier
    • 2
  1. 1.Faculté de MédecineUniversité de BatnaBatnaAlgérie
  2. 2.GREPOUFR de PharmacieLa TroncheFrance

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