Organochlorine Compounds and Xenoestrogens in Human Endometrium

  • Wolfgang R. Schäfer
  • Hans Peter Zahradnik
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 444)

Abstract

Numerous in vitro-studies have demonstrated weak estrogenic effects of a large number of environmental chemicals (Jobling et al., 1995; Soto et al., 1994; Colborn and Clement, 1992). A major limitation of in vitro-testing is that it does not account for pharmacokinetic properties of the test compounds. Many xenoestrogens contain hydroxy groups or ester bonds which render them to rapid biotransformation and elimination. However, due to chronic intake buildung up of equilibrium concentrations of those compounds cannot be excluded. Therefore, human exposure data of reproductive tissues with environmental chemicals, e. g. xenoestrogens, are a prerequisite for prioritizing potential harzardous compounds for further risk assessment. In our study we have investigated tissue concentrations of organochlorines and xenoestrogens (e. g. DDT, PCB, HCB, HCH, endosulfane, alkylphenols, bisphenol A, phthalates and butylated hydroxyanisol) (Fig. 1) in human endometrium and in body fat.

Keywords

Estrogenic Activity Reproductive Tissue Estrogenic Effect Organochlorine Compound Human Endometrium 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Jobling, S., Reynolds, T., White, R., Parker, M.G. and Sumpter, J.P., 1995, A variety of environmentally persistent chemicals, including some phthalate plasticizers, are weakly estrogenic, Environ. Health Perspect. 103: 582–587.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Soto, A.M., Chung, K.L. and Sonnenschein, C., 1994, The pesticides endosulfan, toxaphene, and dieldrin have estrogenic effects on human estrogen-sensitive cells, Environ Health Perspect 102: 380–383.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Colborn, T. and Clement, C., 1992, Chemically-induced alterations in sexual and functional development: The wildlife/human connection, Princeton Scientific Publishing, Princeton, NJ.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Wolfgang R. Schäfer
    • 1
  • Hans Peter Zahradnik
    • 1
  1. 1.Dep. of Obstetrics & GynecologyAlbert-Ludwigs-UniversityFreiburgGermany

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