Physical Handicaps

  • Betsey A. Benson
  • Barbara Hunter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Physically handicapped children are a diverse group. Limitations in a child’s physical capabilities may be apparent at birth or may be diagnosed several years later. Physical disabilities may be due to inborn characteristics or may develop in a normal child following illness or accident. Physical handicaps may be stable or progressive, mild or severe, visible or invisible.

Keywords

Cerebral Palsy Muscular Dystrophy Physical Handicap Spina Bifida Handicapped Child 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Betsey A. Benson
    • 1
  • Barbara Hunter
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of Illinois at ChicagoChicagoUSA

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