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Driving Gene Expression Specifically in Dendritic Cells

  • Thomas Brocker
  • Mireille Riedinger
  • Klaus Karjalainen
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 417)

Abstract

Lymphoid dendritic cells (DC) play an important role in the immune system. They are potent inducers of primary T cell responses and play a crucial part as MHC class II+ “interdigitating cells” in the thymus during thymocyte development. Most of our knowledge about DC was obtained using highly invasive and manipulatory experimental protocols. Since the functions of DC after these in vitro manipulations have been reported not to be identical to those of DC in vivo (1), we intended to establish a system that would allow us to investigate DC-function avoiding artificial interferences due to handling. Here we present a transgenic mouse system in which we targeted gene expression specifically to DC. Using the mouse CD11c promoter we expressed MHC class II I-E molecules specifically on DC of all tissues, but not on other cell types.

Keywords

Thymocyte Development Drive Gene Expression Grey Histogram Interdigitating Cell Medullary Epithelial Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Brocker
    • 1
  • Mireille Riedinger
    • 1
  • Klaus Karjalainen
    • 1
  1. 1.Basel Institute for ImmunologyBaselSwitzerland

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