The Role of Dendritic Cells in the Transport of HIV to Lymph Nodes Analysed in Mouse

  • C. Masurier
  • N. Guettari
  • C. Pioche
  • R. Lacave
  • B. Salomon
  • F. Lachapelle
  • D. Klatzmann
  • M. Guigon
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 417)

Abstract

The migration route of dendritic cells (DC) from peripheral tissues to lymph nodes (1) and their capacity to pass HIV infection to T cells (2–4) support a critical role for DC in the early events of HIV infection. It is assumed, but not yet demonstrated, that DC are the first HIV target cells in the mucosa and that their migration to draining lymph nodes will result in the transmission of HIV to T lymphocytes. Interestingly, this can be studied in a murine model, although murine cells are not susceptible to HIV infection. Indeed, (i) murine DC pre-incubated with HIV are able to transfer it to human T lymphocytes as efficiently as human DC (4); (ii) murine DC can be manipulated in vitro, re-injected, and their in vivo migration can be analysed.

Keywords

Dendritic Cell Drain Lymph Node Inguinal Lymph Node Mouse Bone Marrow Human Dendritic Cell 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. Masurier
    • 1
  • N. Guettari
    • 1
  • C. Pioche
    • 1
  • R. Lacave
    • 1
  • B. Salomon
    • 1
  • F. Lachapelle
    • 2
  • D. Klatzmann
    • 1
  • M. Guigon
    • 1
  1. 1.ERS 107 CNRS, UPMCCHU La Pitié-SalpétriêreParisFrance
  2. 2.INSERM U134CHU La Pitié-SalpétriêreParisFrance

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