An Attempt to Induce Tolerance with Infusion of Donor Bone Marrow in Organ Allograft Recipients

  • Abdul S. Rao
  • D. Phil
  • Paulo Fontes
  • Anand Iyengar
  • Adelouahab Aitouche
  • Ron Shapiro
  • Adriana Zeevi
  • Forrest Dodson
  • Robert Corry
  • Cristiana Rastellini
  • John J. Fung
  • Thomas E. Starzl
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 417)

Abstract

Early observations by Snell and Steinmuller provided unequivocal evidence that non-parenchymal cells, resident within the organ play an important role in allograft rejection1–3.

Keywords

Donor Bone Marrow Islet Allograft Mixed Leukocyte Reaction Bone Marrow Infusion Passenger Leukocyte 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Abdul S. Rao
    • 1
  • D. Phil
    • 2
    • 3
  • Paulo Fontes
    • 2
  • Anand Iyengar
    • 2
  • Adelouahab Aitouche
    • 2
  • Ron Shapiro
    • 2
  • Adriana Zeevi
    • 3
  • Forrest Dodson
    • 2
  • Robert Corry
    • 2
  • Cristiana Rastellini
    • 2
  • John J. Fung
    • 2
  • Thomas E. Starzl
    • 2
  1. 1.Thomas E. Starzl Transplantation InstituteUSA
  2. 2.Department of SurgeryUniversity of Pittsburgh Medical CenterPittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Department of PathologyUniversity of Pittsburgh Medical CenterPittsburghUSA

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