A Newly Identified Antigen Retention Compartment in the FSDC Precursor Dendritic Cell Line

  • Manfred B. Lutz
  • Patrizia Rovere
  • Monique J. Kleijmeer
  • Caroline U. Aßmann
  • Viola M. J. Oorschot
  • Maria Rescigno
  • Hans J. Geuze
  • Jean Davoust
  • Paola Ricciardi-Castagnoli
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 417)

Abstract

Antigen uptake and presentation by dendritic cells (DC) occur at different stages of their maturation and are directed by certain cytokines (1–3). Phagocytosis (4) as well as mannose receptor-mediated endocytosis through clathrin-coated pits and fluid-phase macropinocytosis have been described for human and murine DC at the immature developmental stage (5, 6). Antigen presentation capacity of those cells is weak. After antigen contact with an atnigen or proinflammatory cytokines they mature under loss of the antigen uptake capabilities, but upregulate surface MHC class II and costimulatory molecules for antigen presentation. In vivo, resting DC of non-lymphoid organs internalize antigens and transport them to the draining lymph nodes. In the T cell areas of the lymph node the now fully mature interdigitating DC is able to initiate primary T cell responses. During migration the DC undergoes maturation, but antigen processing should be delayed until it reaches the lymph node. In the precursor DC line FSDC (6, 7), we have now identified a specialized antigen retention compartment, and propose a mechanism of how antigens within these vesicles are prevented from degradation by lysosomal enzymes.

Keywords

Dendritic Cell Mycobacterium Avium Lucifer Yellow Antigen Uptake Antigen Presentation Capacity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manfred B. Lutz
    • 1
  • Patrizia Rovere
    • 2
  • Monique J. Kleijmeer
    • 3
  • Caroline U. Aßmann
    • 1
  • Viola M. J. Oorschot
    • 3
  • Maria Rescigno
    • 1
  • Hans J. Geuze
    • 3
  • Jean Davoust
    • 2
  • Paola Ricciardi-Castagnoli
    • 1
  1. 1.CNR Cellular and Molecular Pharmacology CenterMilanItaly
  2. 2.Centre d’Immunologie INSERM-CNRS de Marseille-LuminyFrance
  3. 3.Department of Cell Biology, School of Medicine Institute of BiomembranesUtrecht UniversityThe Netherlands

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