Organized Dissonance

Multiple Code Structures in the Replication of Human Culture
  • Roland Fletcher
Part of the Interdisciplinary Contributions to Archaeology book series (IDCA)

Abstract

Since culture is plainly not the same as biology, its replicative system should be unlike that of genetics in some profound way. The central issue of a cultural equivalent of the Darwinian model of evolution is that the nature and operation of the cultural equivalent of genetics has yet to be rigorously defined. If, therefore, a Darwinian approach to culture is to be of consequence, it must specify how culture is coded and identify the way in which culture is replicated. We have to identify the nature and operation of the units of cultural replication.

Keywords

Archaeological Record Message System Verbal Meaning Cultural Code Message Structure 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roland Fletcher
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Archaeology, School of Archaeology, Classics, and Ancient HistoryThe University of SydneyAustralia

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