The Vocal Behavior of Barbary Macaques (Macaca Sylvanus): Call Features and Their Performance in Infants and Adults

  • Dietmar Todt
  • Kurt Hammerschmidt
  • Viveka Ansorge
  • Julia Fischer

Abstract

Listening to primate vocal signals entails witnessing episodes of social significance, and students of primate social behavior are well advised to investigate such episodes, but at same time also the features of signals escorting them. Today, the study of vocal communication profits tremendously from progress in technology, which in particular allows for a parametric analysis of signal patterns and their subsequent categorization by non-subjective criteria (Beeman, 1989; Gautier and Gautier-Hion, 1988; Hammerschmidt, 1990; Hauser et al., 1993; Newman and Goedeking, 1992; Schrader and Todt, 1993). These procedures confirmed, for instance, that the concept of ‘multi-dimensional definition of call types’ is a useful tool for addressing both the composition of signal repertoires and the rules of repertoire performance or use, respectively (Hammerschmidt et al., 1994b; Owren et al., 1992). Compared to a pragmatic view describing call types as ’vocal patterns invariantly appearing in the same uniform configuration of structural properties’ (Robinson and Whitehead, 1988), the novel concept is more operational: It defines calls within a multidimensional parameter space and characterizes a particular type of call by a nucleus of significantly correlated parameter expressions within that space (Todt, 1986; Todt et al., 1992). This concept allows to investigate call type variations and also the conditions to which modifications of parameter expressions covary. Thereby, it provides a chance to address the interactional role of vocal patterns in a sophisticated manner.

Keywords

Alarm Call Call Type Call Duration Discriminant Function Analysis Call Sequence 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Dietmar Todt
    • 1
  • Kurt Hammerschmidt
    • 1
  • Viveka Ansorge
    • 1
  • Julia Fischer
    • 1
  1. 1.Institut für VerhaltensbiologieFreie Universität BerlinBerlinGermany

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