The Theory of Electron Transport in Crystalline Semiconductors

  • P. N. Butcher
Part of the Physics of Solids and Liquids book series (PSLI)

Abstract

We are concerned in this chapter with the transport of electric charge and heat by electrons in crystalline semiconductors. When the crystal is in uniform thermal equilibrium the distribution of electrons over the eigenstates available to them in each region of the crystal is controlled by the Fermi-Dirac distribution function and the electric and heat current densities both vanish everywhere. Nonvanishing macroscopic current densities arise whenever the equilibrium is made nonuniform by varying either the electrochemical potential or the temperature from point to point in the crystal. The electron distribution in each region is then perturbed because electrons move from filled states to adjacent empty states.

Keywords

Brillouin Zone Gallium Arsenide Transport Coefficient Hall Mobility Linearize Boltzmann Equation 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. N. Butcher
    • 1
  1. 1.University of WarwickCoventryEngland

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