Help-Seeking as a Coping Mechanism

  • Thomas Ashby Wills
Part of the The Plenum Series on Stress and Coping book series (SSSO)

Abstract

This chapter discusses how individuals can cope with negative life events through seeking help from other persons. When presented with adverse or demanding events, people can respond by seeking help from a husband or wife, from family members or relatives, or from members of larger community networks. Individuals may obtain help primarily within the context of informal social support; they may seek help from formal agencies or professional helpers; or they may combine formal and informal sources of help. In this chapter I discuss the variety of supportive resources that are potentially available to distressed persons, suggest some propositions about factors that influence help-seeking behavior, and delineate some functional mechanisms through which help-seeking may be related to adjustment and well-being.

Keywords

Social Support Psychological Distress Social Comparison Coping Mechanism Negative Life Event 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas Ashby Wills
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Psychology and EpidemiologyFerkauf Graduate School of Psychology and Albert Einstein College of MedicineBronxUSA

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