Humoral Aspects of the Ventilatory Reactions to Exercise by Flux Inhalation of Carbon Dioxide

  • Poul-Erik Paulev
  • Yoshimi Miyamoto
  • Michael John Mussell
  • Kyuichi Niizeki

Abstract

The human respiratory controller (RC) accurately matches ventilation to carbon dioxide output during exercise, and often maintains the average alveolar (PACO2) and arterial (PaCO2) CO2 tension at a normocapnic level, close to that at rest (1, 7).

Keywords

Constant Flux Steady State Exercise Carbon Dioxide Output Sport Science Review Carotid Chemoreceptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Poul-Erik Paulev
    • 1
    • 2
  • Yoshimi Miyamoto
    • 1
  • Michael John Mussell
    • 1
  • Kyuichi Niizeki
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Information Engineering, Faculty of EngineeringYamagata UniversityYonezawaJapan
  2. 2.Medical Physiology Panum InstituteUniversity of CopenhagenCopenhagenDenmark

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