Ventilatory Responses to Respiratory and Acute Metabolic Acidosis in Man

  • I. D. Clement
  • D. A. Bascom
  • K. L. Dorrington
  • R. Painter
  • J. J. Pandit
  • P. A. Robbins

Abstract

The Lloyd-Cunningham model1 of the chemical control of breathing in man describes the steady-state central and peripheral chemoreflex drives as being independent and additive. The model is supported by observations in the anaesthetised cat using the technique of independent perfusion of the central and peripheral chemoreceptors2. However there is also some evidence suggesting that there may be a mutual interaction between the central and peripheral chemoreflex sensitivities. Bellville et al.3 fitted a two-compartment model to the ventilatory responses of human subjects to steps in Pet CO2 and found the slow compartment (central chemoreceptor) gain was greater in hypoxia than euoxia in 6 out of 7 human subjects. Robbins4 found evidence for interaction between the hypoxic ventilatory response and the level of central PCO2 in two out of three subjects.

Keywords

Ventilatory Response Hypoxic Response Peripheral Chemoreceptor Hypoxic Ventilatory Response Central Chemoreceptor 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • I. D. Clement
    • 1
  • D. A. Bascom
    • 1
  • K. L. Dorrington
    • 1
  • R. Painter
    • 1
  • J. J. Pandit
    • 1
  • P. A. Robbins
    • 1
  1. 1.University Laboratory of PhysiologyOxfordUK

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