Improving the Human Condition through Communication Training in Autism

  • Jennifer L. Twachtman
Chapter
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Intentional communication is more than just the words we choose or the gestures and paralinguistic features (e.g., tone of voice, intonation and stress patterns) we use to augment them. At its most basic level it is an active effort to affect one’s environment—the power to make adaptations and/or bring about change in the human condition. Indeed, the human being’s ability to communicate may well be considered his or her “crowning” achievement. It is through the use of a shared symbol system that we are able to code and express past and present experiences, speculate about future events, deal with reality, and contemplate the imaginary. Notwithstanding its complexity, communication is often taken for granted, given its perceived “universality” among human beings and the apparent effortlessness with which it develops in most people.

Keywords

Developmental Disorder Developmental Disability Autistic Child Joint Attention Pervasive Developmental Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jennifer L. Twachtman
    • 1
  1. 1.Braintree Hospital Pediatric CenterBraintreeUSA

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