Recent Developments in Neuropsychological Assessment of the Elderly and Individuals with Severe Dementia

  • Paul D. Nussbaum
  • Daniel Allen
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

The United States is experiencing a demographic revolution in which individuals 65 years of age and older are comprising a larger percentage of the general population. Indeed, although 12% of the population is now considered elderly (defined as 65 and older), this number will increase to approximately 20% by the year 2030 (La Rue, 1992). The “baby boom generation,” which represents 76 million individuals, will begin to turn 65 years of age in the year 2010. The demographic revolution will place tremendous pressure on the health care system, something we are not prepared to address at the current time.

Keywords

Clinical Dementia Rate Severe Dementia Severe Cognitive Impairment American Geriatrics Society Dementia Rate Scale 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul D. Nussbaum
    • 1
    • 2
  • Daniel Allen
    • 3
  1. 1.Lutheran Affiliated ServicesAging Research and Education CenterMarsUSA
  2. 2.School of MedicineUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA
  3. 3.Department of Veterans Affairs Medical CenterPittsburghUSA

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