The Clinical Utility of Standardized or Flexible Battery Approaches to Neuropsychological Assessment

  • Gerald Goldstein
Part of the Critical Issues in Neuropsychology book series (CINP)

Abstract

Recently, Kane (1991) wrote an extensive review article on the matter of standard and flexible neuropsychological test batteries in which he described the two approaches to assessment, provided the historical backgrounds of both methods, and reviewed a number of tests commonly used in individualized or flexible assessments. In this chapter, I will be dealing with different but complementary matters. For the most part, the chapter will be devoted to a description of the two approaches and an examination of their theoretical foundations. It will be proposed that practice issues are of secondary significance, and that the question of whether one administers the same or different tests to every patient is a relatively trivial matter. It can be stipulated in advance that most practicing clinicians now use a combination of fixed and flexible assessment methods, and that fixed batteries, as strictly defined, are primarily used in research settings in which it is necessary to obtain a large database.

Keywords

Neuropsychological Assessment Specific Syndrome Flexible Approach Discriminant Function Analysis Aphasic Patient 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Gerald Goldstein
    • 1
  1. 1.Pittsburgh VA Health Care SystemUniversity of PittsburghPittsburghUSA

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