Nineteenth-Century Households and Consumer Behavior in Wilmington, Delaware

  • Charles H. LeeDecker
  • Terry H. Klein
  • Cheryl A. Holt
  • Amy Friedlander

Abstract

A recently completed historical and archaeological investigation of Block 1101 in Wilmington, Delaware, has provided important information concerning nineteenth-century urban households, primarily in the area of consumer behavior and household composition. The study block is one block away from Market Street and two blocks away from Front Street, the two primary corridors on which Wilmington’s initial residential and commercial development occurred (Figure 1).

Keywords

Consumer Behavior Household Composition Historical Archaeology Wage Earner Income Strategy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles H. LeeDecker
    • 1
  • Terry H. Klein
    • 2
  • Cheryl A. Holt
    • 3
  • Amy Friedlander
    • 1
  1. 1.Louis Berger & AssociatesUSA
  2. 2.Louis Berger & AssociatesEast OrangeUSA
  3. 3.Analytical Services for ArchaeologistsAlexandriaUSA

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