Existential Psychotherapies

  • James F. T. Bugental
  • Richard I. Kleiner

Abstract

What is is what exists. Existential perspectives attend to existence, to what is. Rather than postulating some other basic drive—for example, sexuality, power—an existential orientation sees the fact of being itself as the central issue of our lives. How shall we be alive? What are we making of the miracle of our conscious being? How are we to be more fully, more truly realizing (i.e., recognizing and making actual) that which is latent within our nature? This is the outlook and the challenge of existentialism.

Keywords

Therapeutic Alliance Existential Issue Existential Approach Life Concern Existential Anxiety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • James F. T. Bugental
    • 1
  • Richard I. Kleiner
    • 2
  1. 1.Saybrook Institute and California School of Professional PsychologyBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.Bay Counseling and ConsultingMountain ViewUSA

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