Supervision and Instruction in Doctoral Psychotherapy Integration

  • Conrad Lecomte
  • Louis Georges Castonguay
  • Mireille Cyr
  • Stéphane Sabourin

Abstract

The movement of rapprochement and integration between different theoretical schools is currently one of the most active and dynamic areas of interest in the field of counseling and psychotherapy (Arkowitz & Messer, 1984; Lecomte & Castonguay, 1987; Marmor & Woods, 1980; Norcross, 1986). In fact, the sheer number of publications dealing with eclecticism, integration, or rapprochement has reached proportions that could have hardly been predicted 15 years ago (Goldfried & Newman, 1986). It can even be argued that the influence of this movement has reached the training boards of major professional associations (American Psychological Association, Canadian Psychological Association), which now expect future clinicians to become familiar with a wide range of assessment and intervention procedures, rather than being restricted to a single modality (APA, 1979; CPA, 1983).

Keywords

Professional Identity Supervisory Relationship Object Relation Theory Supervision Program Psychotherapy Integration 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Conrad Lecomte
    • 1
  • Louis Georges Castonguay
    • 2
  • Mireille Cyr
    • 1
  • Stéphane Sabourin
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniversity of MontrealMontrealCanada
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyState University of New York at Stony BrookStony BrookUSA

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