An Integrative Approach to Psychotherapy with Black/African Americans

The Relevance of Race and Culture
  • Anderson J. Franklin
  • Robert T. Carter
  • Cynthia Grace

Abstract

This chapter is written for the purpose of bringing together a somewhat disparate body of knowledge about treatment with Black/African American patients.1 We attempt to offer a view consistent with the goals of the handbook, in that we try to integrate the more recent theoretical concepts, research findings, and clinical thinking about psychotherapy with Blacks using knowledge about multisystems and racial identity development. Our particular perspective can be used in treating Blacks because it offers a unique and meaningful framework to conceptualizing a dynamic context for patients and therapist’s behav ior both in and out of therapy.

Keywords

Black Community Racial Identity AFRICAN AMERICANS Black Family Black Person 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anderson J. Franklin
    • 1
  • Robert T. Carter
    • 2
  • Cynthia Grace
    • 3
  1. 1.Doctoral Program in Clinical PsychologyCity College of the City University of New YorkNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.Doctoral Program in Counseling Psychology, Teachers CollegeColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA
  3. 3.Department of PsychologyCity College of the City University of New YorkNew YorkUSA

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