Empirical Research on Factors in Psychotherapeutic Change

  • Diane B. Arnkoff
  • Brian J. Victor
  • Carol R. Glass

Abstract

One of the prime reasons that psychotherapists have come to have a strong interest in psychotherapy integration is that the competition among schools of therapy has, on the whole, generated more heat than light (Arnkoff & Glass, 1992). Recently, therapists have become interested in the ways in which orientations are similar in spite of surface distinctions, as well as the ways in which they are truly different. This focus on common and specific factors has been accompanied by renewed curiosity about how psychotherapy accomplishes its goals, that is, the process of psychotherapy and how processes relate to outcome. In this chapter, we will first discuss empirical research on common and specific factors across schools of therapy.

Keywords

Common Factor Cognitive Therapy Therapeutic Alliance Interpersonal Process Client Characteristic 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Diane B. Arnkoff
    • 1
  • Brian J. Victor
    • 1
  • Carol R. Glass
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyCatholic University of AmericaUSA

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