Abstract

Adolescence begins with the onset of puberty and can continue into the twenties with the accomplishment of a series of developmental tasks, including growing independence from parents, forging an enduring sense of identity, establishing satisfactory peer relationships, and developing a satisfactory set of life goals. Those who work with adolescents encounter a broad array of issues and problems which vary considerably based on developmental levels, family and environmental supports, and the nature of the presenting problem. Work with adolescents demands an integrative approach. In contrast to adult therapy, where the external world often remains outside the bounds of direct therapeutic intervention, the problems posed by adolescent patients often demand interaction with an array of adults including parents, school authorities, and, at times, others in the community. In addition to combining psychodynamic and behavioral approaches, the integrative therapist must decide when and how frequently to include family members in the therapy.

Keywords

Bulimia Nervosa Family Therapy Pervasive Developmental Disorder Family Meeting Gender Identity Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mary FitzPatrick
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryThe New York Hospital-Cornell Medical CenterNew YorkUSA

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