The Role of Cognitive Change in Psychotherapy

  • Larry E. Beutler
  • Paul D. Guest

Abstract

Identifying the roles that cognitive change is thought to play among contemporary psychotherapies represents a considerable challenge. This task assumes that one can recognize the commonalities among approaches that masquerade as differences and the differences that masquerade as similarities. Extracting meaningful similarities and differences confronts us with the thorny and multifaceted issue of assigning causal relationships among cognitions, emotional distress, and behaviors, as viewed both from the vantage point of diverse theories and from empirical literature.

Keywords

Cognitive Content Cognitive Therapy Cognitive Change Cognitive Structure Abnormal Psychology 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry E. Beutler
    • 1
  • Paul D. Guest
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Psychiatry, College of MedicineUniversity of ArizonaTucsonUSA
  2. 2.Program 3Patton State HospitalPattonUSA

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