The Measurement of Cognition in Psychopathology

Clinical and Research Applications
  • Joel O. Goldberg
  • Brian F. Shaw

Abstract

With the increasing growth and success of cognitive treatments for a variety of psychopathological conditions, there has been an accompanying need to identify the cognitions associated with dysfunction, to quantify the changes in therapy, and to evaluate beliefs that predict treatment responsiveness. The cognitive measurement field has harvested a diverse range of assessment techniques and instruments. However, the research and development of cognitive assessment methods tends to neglect important principles in test and measurement construction that has made it more difficult for interesting techniques to find their way from the laboratory into clinical practice.

Keywords

Anorexia Nervosa Social Anxiety Cognitive Therapy Cognitive Assessment Dental Anxiety 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Joel O. Goldberg
    • 1
  • Brian F. Shaw
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PsychiatryUniversity of TorontoTorontoCanada

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