Advertisement

Piagetian Theory and Cognitive Therapy

  • Hugh Rosen

Abstract

The Piagetian paradigm holds considerable promise for providing developmental depth to extant cognitive therapy models, as well as for generating clinical guidelines and strategies. It also offers theoretical and empirical support for much of what is already current practice (Rosen, 1985). The primary aim of this chapter is to provide a succinct exposition of Piaget’s theory and to examine a leading model of cognitive therapy from its perspective.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Amkoff, D. B. (1980). Psychotherapy from the perspective of cognitive therapy. In M. J. Mahoney (Ed.), Psychotherapy process (pp. 339–361 ) New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  2. Barker, P. (1985). Using metaphors in psychotherapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  3. Beck, A. T. (1976). Cognitive therapy and the emotional disorders. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  4. Beck, A. T., and Emery, G. (1985). Anxiety disorders and phobias: A cognitive perspective. New York: Basic Books.Google Scholar
  5. Beck, A. T., Rush, A. J., Shaw, B. F., and Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of depression. New York, Guilford.Google Scholar
  6. Bobbit, B. L., and Keating, D. P. (1983). A cognitive-developmental perspective for clinical research and practice. In P. C. Kendall (Ed.), Advances in cognitive behavioral research and therapy (pp. 198–239 ). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  7. Bowers, K. S., and Meichenbaum, D. (Eds.). (1984). The unconscious reconsidered. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  8. Chandler, M. J. (1973). Egocentrism and anti-social behavior: The assessment and training of social perspective-taking skills. Developmental Psychology, 9, 326–332.Google Scholar
  9. Chandler, M. J., Greenspan, S., and Barenboim, C. (1974). Assessment and training of role-taking and referential communication skills in institutionalized emotionally disturbed children. Developmental Psychology, 10, 546–553.Google Scholar
  10. Cohen, R., and Scheleser, R. (1984). Clinical development and clinical interventions. In A. W. Meyers and W. E. Craighead (Eds.), Cognitive behavior therapy with children (pp. 45–68 ). New York: Plenum PressGoogle Scholar
  11. Corsini, R. J. (Ed.). (1981). Handbook of innovative psychotherapies. New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  12. Cowan, P. A. (1978). Piaget with feeling. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.Google Scholar
  13. Cowan, P. A. (1982). The relationship between emotional and cognitive development. In: D. Cicchetti and P. Hesse (Eds.). New directions for child development: Emotional development, No. 16 (pp. 49–81 ). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  14. Damon, W. (1977). The social world of the child. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  15. Damon, W. (Ed.). (1978). New directions for child development: Social cognition, No. 1. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  16. Elkind, D. (1967). Egocentrism in adolescence. Child Development, 38, 1025–1034.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  17. Elkind, D. (1974). Children and adolescents: Interpretive essays on Jean Piaget. New York: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  18. Ellis, A. (1962). Reason and emotion in psychotherapy. New York: Lyle Stuart.Google Scholar
  19. Fast, I. (1985). Event theory: A Piaget-Freud integration. Hillsdale, NJ: Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  20. Fiske, S. L., and Taylor, S. E. (1984). Social cognition. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar
  21. Flavell, J. H. (1977). Cognitive development. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  22. Flavell, J. H. (1978). Metacognitive development. In J. M. Scandura and C. J. Brainerd (Eds.), Structural process theories of complex human behavior. Alphen ad Rign, the Netherlands: Sijtoff and Noordhuff.Google Scholar
  23. Flavell, J. H. (1979). Metacognition and cognitive monitoring. American Psychologist, 34, 906–911Google Scholar
  24. Flavell, J. H. (1985). Cognitive development ( 2nd ed. ). Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  25. Flavell, J. H. (1986). The development of children’s knowledge about the appearance-reality distinction.Google Scholar
  26. American Psychologist, 41,418–425.Google Scholar
  27. Flavell, J. H., and Ross, L. (Eds.). (1981). Social cognitive development: Frontiers and possible futures. New York: Cambridge University Press.Google Scholar
  28. Flavell, J. H., and Wellman, H. M. (1977). Metamemory. In R. V. Kail, Jr., and J. W. Hagen (Eds.), Perspectives on the development of memory and cognition (pp. 3–33 ). Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  29. Forrest-Pressley, D. L., MacKinnon, G. E., and Waller, T. G. (Eds.). (1985). Metacognition, cognition, and human performance. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  30. Furth, H. G. (1980). The world of grown-ups: Children’s conceptions of society. New York: Elsevier.Google Scholar
  31. Gallagher, J. M. (1978). Reflexive abstraction and education: The meaning of activity in Piaget’s theory. In J. M. Gallagher and J. A. Easley (Eds.), Knowledge and development. Vol 2: Piaget and education (pp. 1–20 ). New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  32. Gholson, B., and Rosenthal, T. L. (Eds.). (1984). Applications of cognitive-developmental theory. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  33. Goldfried, M. R. (Ed.). (1982). Converging themes in psychotherapy. New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  34. Goldstein, A. P., Lopez, M., and Greenleaf, D. O. (1979). Introduction. In A. P. Goldstein and F. H. Kanfer (Eds.), Maximizing treatment gains: Transfer enhancement in psychotherapy (pp. 1–22 ). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  35. Gordon, D. (1978). Therapeutic metaphors. Cupertino, CA: META Publications.Google Scholar
  36. Greenspan, S. I. (1979). Intelligence and adaptation. New York: International Universities Press.Google Scholar
  37. Guidano, V. F., and Liotti, G. (1983). Cognitive processes and emotional disorders. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar
  38. Haroutunian, S. (1983). Equilibrium in the balance: A study of psychological explanation. New York: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar
  39. Hesse, P., and Cicchetti, D. (1982). Perspectives on an integrated theory of emotional development. In D. Cicchetti and P. Hesse (Eds.), New Directions for child development: Emotional development, No. 16 (pp. 3–48 ). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  40. Hickey, J. E., and Scharf, P. L. (1980). Toward a just correctional system. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  41. Ianotti, R. J. (1978). Effects of role-taking experiences on role-taking, empathy, altruism and aggression. Developmental Psychology, 14, 119–124.Google Scholar
  42. Inhelder, B., and Piaget, J. (1958). The growth of logical thinking from childhood to adolescence (A. Parsons and S. Milgram, Trans.). New York: Basic Books. ( Originally published 1955 )Google Scholar
  43. Inhelder, B., and Piaget, J. (1969). The early growth of logic in the child (E. A. Lunzer and D. Papert, Trans.). New York: Norton. (Originally published 1959 )Google Scholar
  44. Inhelder, B., Sinclair, H., and Bovet, M. (1974). Learning and the development of cognition (S. Wedgwood, Trans.). Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  45. Ivey, A. E. (1986). Developmental therapy. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  46. Izard, C. E. (Ed.). (1979). Emotions in personality and psychopathology. New York: Plenum Press.Google Scholar
  47. Jurkovic, G. J., and Selman, R. L. (1980). A developmental analysis of intrapsychic understanding: Treating emotional disturbances in children. In R. L. Selman and R. Yando (Eds.), New directions for child development: Clinical-developmental psychology, No. 7 (pp. 91–112 ). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  48. Kazdin, A. (1978). History of behavior modifications: Experimental foundations of contemporary research. Baltimore: University Park Press.Google Scholar
  49. Kegan, R. (1982). The evolving self. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.Google Scholar
  50. Kohlberg, L. (1969). Stage and sequence: The cognitive developmental approach to socialization. In D. A. Goslin (Ed.), Handbook of socialization theory and research (pp. 347–480 ). Chicago: Rand McNally.Google Scholar
  51. Kohlberg, L. (1971). From is to ought: How to commit the naturalistic fallacy and get away with it in the study of moral development. In T. Mischel (Ed.), Cognitive development and epistemology (pp. 151–235 ). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  52. Kohlberg, L. (1981). Essays on moral development, Vol. 1, The philosophy of moral development. San Francisco: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  53. Kohlberg, L. (1984). Essays on moral development, Vol. 2, The psychology of moral development. San Francisco: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  54. Kovacs, M. J., Rush, A. T., and Holton, S. D. (1981). Depressed outpatients treated with cognitive therapy in pharmacotherapy. Archives of General Psychiatry, 38, 33–39.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  55. Kuhn, D. (1972). Mechanisms of change in the development of cognitive structures. Child Development, 43, 833–844.Google Scholar
  56. Kuhn, D., Langer, J., Kohlberg, L, and Haan, N. S. (1977). The development of formal operations in logical and moral judgement. Genetic Psychology Monographs, 95, 97–188.Google Scholar
  57. Kuhn, T. S. (1972). The structure of scientific revolutions ( 2nd ed. ). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  58. Lazarus, R. S. (1982). Thoughts on the relations between emotion and cognition. American Psychologist, 37, 1019–1024.Google Scholar
  59. Lazarus, R. S. (1984). On the primacy of cognition. American psychologist, 39, 124–129.Google Scholar
  60. Leva, L. M. (1984). Cognitive behavioral therapy in the light of Piagetian theory. In M. A. Reda and M. J. Mahoney (Eds.), Cognitive psychotherapies (pp. 223–250 ). Cambridge, MA: Ballinger.Google Scholar
  61. Mahoney, M. J. (1976). Scientist as subject: The psychological imperative. Cambridge, MA: Ballinger.Google Scholar
  62. Moshman, D. (1986, May). Discussant of “Necessity: The Developmental Component in Reasoning, by F. Murray. Paper presented at the 16th Annual Jean Piaget Symposium, Philadelphia, PA.Google Scholar
  63. Nisbett, R., and Ross, L. (1980). Human inference: Strategies and shortcomings of social judgement. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  64. Overton, W. F. (Ed.). (1983). The relationship between social and cognitive development. Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.Google Scholar
  65. Piaget, J. (1955). The language and thought of the child (M. Gabain, Trans.). Cleveland: Meridan Books. ( Originally published 1923 )Google Scholar
  66. Piaget, J. (1960). The child’s conception of the world. (J. and A. Tomilson, Trans.). Totowa, NJ: Littlefield, Adams. ( Originally published 1926 )Google Scholar
  67. Piaget, J. (1962a). Play, dreams, and imitation in childhood. (H. Gattegano and F. M. Hodgson, Trans.). New York: Norton. (Originally published 1946 )Google Scholar
  68. Piaget, J. (1962b). Three lectures (The stages of the intellectual development in the child; The relation of affectivity to intelligence in the mental development; Will and Action). Bulletin of the Menninger Clinic, 26, 120–145.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  69. Piaget, J. (1963). The origins of intelligence in the child. (M. Cook, Trans.). New York: Norton. (Originally published 1936 )Google Scholar
  70. Piaget, J. (1964). Development and learning. In R. E. Ripple and V. N. Rockcastle (Eds.), Piaget rediscovered (pp. 7–20 ). Ithaca, NY: School of Education, Cornell University.Google Scholar
  71. Piaget, J. (1968). Six psychological studies (A. Tenzer, Trans.). New York: Vintage Books. ( Originally published 1964 )Google Scholar
  72. Piaget, J. (1969a). Judgement and reasoning in the child (M. Warden, Trans.). Totowa, NJ: Littlefield, Adams. ( Originally published 1924 )Google Scholar
  73. Piaget, J. (1969b). The child’s conception of physical causality (M. Gabain, Trans.). Totowa, NJ: Littlefield, Adams. ( Originally published 1927 )Google Scholar
  74. Piaget, J. (1971). The construction of reality in the child (M. Cook, Trans.). New York: Ballantine. (Originally published 1936 )Google Scholar
  75. Piaget, J. (1972). Intellectual evolution from adolescence to adulthood. Human Development, 15, 1–12.Google Scholar
  76. Piaget, J. (1974). Understanding causality (D. Miles and M. Miles, Trans.). New York: Norton (Originally published 1971 )Google Scholar
  77. Piaget, J. (1976). The grasp of consciousness (S. W. Wedgwood, Trans.) Cambridge: Harvard University Press. ( Originally published 1974 )Google Scholar
  78. Piaget, J. (1977). The development of thought (A. Rosin, Trans.). New York: Viking. (Originally published 1975 )Google Scholar
  79. Piaget, J. (1980a). Adaptation and intelligence (S. Eames, Trans.). Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ( Originally published 1974 )Google Scholar
  80. Piaget, J. (19806). Experiments in contradiction (D. Coltman, Trans.). Chicago: University of Chicago Press. (Originally published 1974 )Google Scholar
  81. Piaget, J. (1981). Intelligence and affectivity: Their relationship during child development (T. A. Brown and C. E. Kaegi, Trans. and Eds.). Palo Alto, CA: Annual Reviews Monograph. (Originally published 1954, in outline form)Google Scholar
  82. Pulaski, M. A. S. (1971). Understanding Piaget. New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  83. Raimy, V. (1975). Misunderstanding of the self. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar
  84. Robinson, E. (1983). Metacognitive development. In S. Meadows (Ed.), Developing thinking. New York: Methuen.Google Scholar
  85. Rosen, H. (1977). Pathway to Piaget. Cherry Hill, NJ: Post-Graduate International.Google Scholar
  86. Rosen, H. (1980). The development of socimoral knowledge. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  87. Rosen, H. (1985). Piagetian dimensions of clinical relevance. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  88. Rush, A. J., Beck, A. T., Kovacs, M., and Hollon, S. (1977). Comparative efficacy of cognitive therapy and pharmacotherapy in the treatment of depressed outpatients. Cognitive Therapy and Research, 1 (1), 17–37.Google Scholar
  89. Selman, R. L. (1976). Social-cognitive understanding: A guide to educational and clinical practice. In T. Lickona (Ed.), Moral development and behavior (pp. 299–316 ). New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.Google Scholar
  90. Selman, R. (1980). The growth of interpersonal understanding. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  91. Shantz, C. W. (1975). The development of social cognition. In E. M. Hetherington (Ed.), Review of development research (Vol. 5; pp. 257–323 ). Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  92. Shantz, C. H. (1983). Social cognition. In J. H. Flavell, and E. M. Markman (Eds.), Handbook of child psychology: Cognitive development Vol. 3; pp. 495–555 ). New York: Wiley.Google Scholar
  93. Shaw, B. F. and Beck, A. T. (1977). The treatment of depression with cognitive therapy. In A. Ellis and R. Grieger (Eds.), Handbook of rational emotive therapy (pp. 309–326 ). New York: Springer.Google Scholar
  94. Siegler, R. S. (1986). Children’s thinking. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice-Hall.Google Scholar
  95. Silvern, L. E., Waterman, J. M., Sobesky, W., and Ryan, V. L. (1979). Effects of a developmental model of perspective taking training. Child Development 50, 243–246.Google Scholar
  96. Siomopoulos, V. (1983). The structure of psychopathological experience. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  97. Smedslund, J. (1961a). The acquisition of conservation of substance and weight in children. I. Introduction. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 2, 11–20.Google Scholar
  98. Smedslund, J. (1961b). The acquisition of conservation of substance and weight in children. II. External reinforcement of conservation of weight and of the operations of addition and subtraction. Scandinavian Journal of Psychology, 2, 71–84.Google Scholar
  99. Tenzer, A. (1983). Piaget and psychoanalysis. Some reflections on insight. Contemporary psychoanalysis, 19, 319–339.Google Scholar
  100. Tversky, A., and Kahnemann, D. (1973). Availability: A heuristic for judging frequency and probability. Cognitive Psychology, 5, 207–232.Google Scholar
  101. Tvriel, E. (1966). An experimental test of the sequentiality of developmental stages in the child’s moral judgments. Journal of personality and social psychology, 3, 611–618.Google Scholar
  102. Urbain, E. S. and Kendall, P. C. (1980). Review of social-cognitive problem-solving interventions with children. Psychological Bulletin, 88, 109–143.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  103. Walker, L. J. (1983). Sources of cognitive conflict for stage transition in moral development. Developmental Psychology, 19, 103–110.Google Scholar
  104. Wason, P. C., and Johnson-Laird, P. N. (1972). The psychology of reasoning. London: Batsford.Google Scholar
  105. Weiner, M. L. (1985). Cognitive-experiential therapy: An integrative ego psychotherapy. New York: Brunner/Mazel.Google Scholar
  106. Weishaar, M. E., and Beck, A. T. (1986). Cognitive therapy. In W. Dryden and W. Golden (Eds.), Cognitive-behavioral approaches to psychotherapy (pp. 61–91 ). London: Harper and Row.Google Scholar
  107. Wellman, H. (1985). The origins of metacognition. In D. L. Forrest-Pressley, G. E. MacKinnon, and T. G. Waller (Eds.), Metacognition, cognition, and human performance (pp. 1–31 ). New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar
  108. Wright, J. H., and Beck, A. T. (1983). Cognitive therapy of depression. Hospital and Community Psychiatry, 34, 1119–1127.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  109. Youniss, J. (1980). Parents and peers in social development. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  110. Zajonc, R. B. (1980). Feeling and thinking: Preferences need no inferences. American Psychologist, 35, 151–175.Google Scholar
  111. Zajonc, R. B., (1984). On the primacy of affect. American Psychologist, 39, 117–123.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hugh Rosen
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Mental Health SciencesHahnemann UniversityPhiladelphiaUSA

Personalised recommendations