Cocaine Abuse

  • Aaron T. Beck
  • Fred D. Wright
  • Cory F. Newman

Abstract

According to the cognitive perspective, the way in which people process information in specific situations determines their affective, motivational, and behavioral reactions. Information processing is shaped in many instances by the relevant beliefs that become activated in these situations. Certain individuals with a vulnerability to drug abuse have specific beliefs that are activated under particular circumstances and, consequently, enhance the likelihood of continued drug use (i.e., stimulate craving). Idiosyncratic beliefs such as “cocaine makes me more social” represent this vulnerability and are assumed to be activated in certain provocative situations.

Keywords

Cognitive Therapy Cocaine Abuse Automatic Thought Drug Taking Male Friend 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

  1. Beck, A. T., Wright, F., & Newman, C. (1990). Cognitive therapy of cocaine abuse. Philadelphia: Center for Cognitive Therapy.Google Scholar

Suggested Readings

  1. Beck, A. T., Wright, F. D., & Newman, C. F. (1990). Cognitive therapy of cocaine abuse. Philadelphia, PA: Center for Cognitive Therapy.Google Scholar
  2. Beck, A. T., & Emery, G. (1979). Cognitive therapy of substance abuse. Philadelphia, PA: Center for Cognitive Therapy.Google Scholar
  3. Beck, A. T., Freeman, A., & Associates (1990). Cognitive therapy of personality disorders. New York: Guilford.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Aaron T. Beck
    • 1
  • Fred D. Wright
    • 1
  • Cory F. Newman
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Cognitive Therapy, Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Pennsylvania School of MedicinePhiladelphiaUSA

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