Phonatory and Resonatory Problems of Organic Origin

  • Edward D. Mysak
  • Carol N. Wilder

Abstract

This chapter was first prepared by one of the present authors (Mysak) and published in 1966. Since that time the area of organic phonatory and resonatory problems has, like most areas of speech pathology, undergone an “information explosion.” Significant advances in knowledge have occurred in the areas of anatomy and physiology of respiration and phonation, in instrumentation to study and analyze normal and abnormal respiratory and phonatory phenomena, as well as in medicosurgical and voice therapy intervention procedures. It is no longer possible for the voice researcher, physician, or clinician to keep abreast easily with all the developments in the basic and applied areas of human voicing. With this in mind, this chapter was designed to build upon the first by incorporating the most pertinent findings in the area of human voicing and its care over the last fifteen years.

Keywords

Vocal Fold Cleft Palate Vocal Rehabilitation Voice Disorder Hearing Disorder 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Edward D. Mysak
    • 1
  • Carol N. Wilder
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Teachers CollegeColumbia UniversityNew YorkUSA

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