Applied Color-Vision Research

  • David L. Post
Part of the Defense Research Series book series (DRSS, volume 3)

Abstract

Most of us recognize from personal experience that, when they are designed properly, multicolor displays are not only more pleasing aesthetically than monochrome displays, but also convey more information and/or do so at higher rates. (Perhaps this is why they are more pleasing.) The catch is that color must be used “properly”; therefore, much of the applied color-vision research that has been performed has been directed toward increasing our understanding of how to do this. This chapter reviews some of the topics that have attracted special interest and, where it is appropriate, makes recommendations based upon the research findings.

Keywords

Color Vision Optical Society Stimulus Size Luminance Contrast Macular Pigment 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • David L. Post
    • 1
  1. 1.Armstrong LaboratoryWright-Patterson Air Force BaseUSA

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