Partitioning of Momentum in Electron-Impact Double Ionization

  • John H. Moore
  • Michael J. Ford
  • Michael A. Coplan
  • John W. Cooper
  • John P. Doering
Part of the Physics of Atoms and Molecules book series (PAMO)

Abstract

A complete description of electron-impact double ionization requires the determination of the momenta of the scattered projectile and two ejected electrons. The experiment is referred to as (e,3e) implying a collision in which an incident electron gives rise to three electrons that are detected in coincidence. The cross section for a given incident-electron energy and a specified final state of the doubly-charge ion is eightfold differential and is typically reported as a function of the solid angle of acceptance of the detectors of the three outgoing electrons and the energy bandpass of two of these detectors (the energy of the third electron being fixed by conservation of energy).

Keywords

Incident Electron Ionic Core Double Ionization Recoil Momentum Outgoing Electron 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • John H. Moore
    • 1
  • Michael J. Ford
    • 1
  • Michael A. Coplan
    • 2
  • John W. Cooper
    • 2
  • John P. Doering
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of ChemistryUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  2. 2.Institute for Physical Science and TechnologyUniversity of MarylandCollege ParkUSA
  3. 3.Department of ChemistryJohns Hopkins UniversityBaltimoreUSA

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