Contemporary Clinical Psychology

  • Brian W. DeSantis
  • C. Eugene Walker
Part of the Applied Clinical Psychology book series (NSSB)

Abstract

Clinical psychology has undergone rapid evolution during its relatively brief history. Since World War II, clinical psychology has greatly expanded in several major dimensions, including academia, science, research, professional issues, and concerns for the public interest (Barron, 1986). New psychology doctorates in the health-service-provider subfields of clinical, counseling, and school psychology constitute the majority (53.2%) of new psychology doctorates (Howard et al., 1986). Clinical psychology accounts for 40% of all psychology doctorates awarded annually (Strickland, 1985), and the Division of Clinical Psychology has become the largest division within the American Psychological Association (APA, 1989).

Keywords

Mental Health Care Private Practice American Psychologist American Psychological Association Clinical Psychologist 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brian W. DeSantis
    • 1
  • C. Eugene Walker
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Mental Health/SGHAC USAF Medical CenterWright-Patterson Air Force BaseOhioUSA
  2. 2.Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral SciencesUniversity of Oklahoma Health Sciences CenterOklahoma CityUSA

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