MHC-Related Odors in Humans

  • Roman Ferstl
  • Frank Eggert
  • Eckhard Westphal
  • Nicholaus Zavazava
  • Wolfgang Muller-Ruchholtz

Abstract

Up to now, MHC-related odors have been only described for rodents Yamazaki et al., 1991; Roser et al., 1991). Nevertheless, it has been speculated that a similar phenomenon may also occur in humans (Beauchamp et al., 1985; Boyse et al., 1987). Individual specific body odors do indeed play a role in human self-perception (Porter and Moore, 1981; Lord and Kasprzak, 1989) and recognition of offspring (Porter et al., 1983; Kaitz et al., 1987), but there is no information available on the biological basis of these odors.

Keywords

Body Odor Carrier Stream Reference Trial Urine Odor Sweat Sample 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Albone, E.S., 1984, “Mammalian semiochemistry: The investigation of chemical signals between mammals”, Wiley, New York.Google Scholar
  2. Beauchamp, G.K., Yamazaki, K. and Boyse, E.A., 1985, The chemosensory recognition of genetic individuality, Sci. Am., 253: 86.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Boyse, E.A., Beauchamp, G.K. and Yamazaki, K., 1987, The genetics of body scent, Tr. Genet., 3: 97.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Kaitz, M., Good, A., Rokem, A.M. and Eidelman, A.I., 1987, Mothers’ recognition of their newborns by olfactory cues, Developm. Psychobiol., 20: 587.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Lord, T. and Kasprzak, M., 1989, Identification of self through olfaction, Percept. Mot. Skills, 69: 219.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Porter, R.H. and Moore, J.D., 1981, Human kin recognition by olfactory cues, Physiol. Behay., 27: 493.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Porter, R.H., Cernoch, J.M., and McLaughlin, F.J., 1983, Maternal recognition of neonates through olfactory cues, Physiol. Behay., 30: 151.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Roser, B., Brown, R.E. and Singh, P.B., 1991, Excretion of transplantation antigens as signals of individuality, in: “Chemical Senses”, Vol. 3, Genetics of Perception and Communication, C.J. Wysocki and M.R. Kare, eds., Marcel Dekker, New York.Google Scholar
  9. Schwende, F.J., Jorgenson, W.J. and Novotny, M., 1984, Possible chemical basis for histocompatibility-related mating preference in mice, J. Chem. Ecol., 10: 1603.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Yamazaki, K., Beauchamp, G.K., Bard, J., Boyse, E.A. and Thomas, L., 1991, Chemosensory identity and immune function in mice, in: “Chemical Senses”, Vol. 3, Genetics of Perception and Communications, C.J. Wysocki and M. R. Kare, eds., Marcel Dekker, New York.Google Scholar
  11. Zavazava, N., Westphal, E. and Muller-Ruchholtz, W., 1990, Characterization of soluble HLA molecules in sweat and quantitative HLA differences in serum of health individuals, J. Immunogenet., 17: 387.PubMedCrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Roman Ferstl
    • 1
  • Frank Eggert
    • 1
  • Eckhard Westphal
    • 2
  • Nicholaus Zavazava
    • 2
  • Wolfgang Muller-Ruchholtz
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyUniveristy of KielKielGermany
  2. 2.Department of ImmunologyUniveristy of KielKielGermany

Personalised recommendations