Swelling clays and related complex layered oxides

  • Thomas J. Pinnavaia
Part of the NATO ASI Series book series (NSSB, volume 172)

Abstract

The geological term “clay” refers to any naturally occuring material with a particle size less than 2μ. However, the term “clay mineral” refers to a specific composition of matter and a discrete structure, but with a particle size less than 2μ. Clay minerals are usually layered oxides. Included in this family are the layered silicate clays.

Keywords

Electron Spin Resonance Clay Mineral Pillared Clay Octahedral Sheet Bronsted Acidity 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media New York 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • Thomas J. Pinnavaia
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Chemistry and Center for Fundamental Materials ResearchMichigan State UniversityEast LansingUSA

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